Magnetic Materials Solution

Magpole Technology is able to provide many kinds of magnets. Our main magnetic materials products range includes sintered NdFeB, ferrite magnets, AlNiCo, sintered SmCO. We specialise in special-shaped and micro magnet of NdFeB, Ferrite, SmCo and AlNiCo from olive-shape to mm scale micro magnet.

Special shape magnet Cast AlNiCo Magnets
Sintered Ferrite Magnets micro smco magnets

Cast AlNiCo Magnets

Cast AlNiCo Magnets

AlNiCo material is comprised of aluminum,nickel,cobalt and iron with varying additions of other elements.There are two different manufacturing processes for AlNiCo:Cast and sintered.

Alnico magnets can be made into many shapes and sizes during manufacturing process by using the casting processing method. Cast Alnico magnets are manufactured by pouring the molten metal alloy of Alnico into a mold and then further processing it through heat treated and cooled alternatively. The solidified material has a dark gray appearance on the exterior and may be roughly ground. Magnets that have been polished using machines, may have a shiny gray surface similar to that of steel.

Attributes of Alnico Magnets:

  • high flux density
  • superior temperature stability
  • economical and suitable for the manufacture of magnet of relatively large size
  • excellent temperature characteristics of any standard production magnet material available

Applications of Alnico Magnets:

  • precision instruments
  • advanced electrical meters
  • water meters
  • mobile odometers
  • eletricity motor switch
  • sensors
  • electroacooustic and telecommunication devices
  • spinning topes and microwave devices

Sintered AlNiCo Magnets

Sintered AlNiCo Magnets

AlNiCo material is comprised of aluminum,nickel,cobalt and iron with varying additions of other elements.There are two different manufacturing processes for AlNiCo:Cast and sintered.Cast AlNiCo can be made into many sizes and shapes,whereas Sintered AlNiCo is usually restricted to smaller sizes.However,both processes lead themselves to complex geometries and configurations.Standard Sintered AlNiCo has tighter dimensional tolerances due to its processing.It also has slighty lower magnetic properties,but better mechanical strength than Cast AlNiCo products.They are most suitable for small sizes that are less than 1 oz. It also results in parts that are structurally stronger than the cast alnico magnets. With the sintering process, one can achieve relatively close tolerances without any grinding.

Sintered Alnico magnets are formed by compacting fine Alnico powder in a press and then sintering the compacted powder into a solid magnet. The powdered mixture of contents is pressed into a die under tons of pressure. It is then sintered in a hydrogen atmosphere at 2300F and then cooled – either within a magnetic field or without a magnetic field. When cooled within the magnetic field it is known as an anisotropic magnet and when cooled outside of a magnetic field it is called an isotropic magnet. The sintering process is well suited to large volume production.

Attributes of Alnico Magnets:

  • High mechanical strength, suitable for small volume magnets with complex shape.
  • Working temperature can reach 550-600 °C
  • Does not lend itself to conventional machining (hard and brittle)
  • Good corrosion resistance;
  • High residual induction and energy product compared to ceramic material
  • Excellent temperature stability (temp. coefficient of Br is the smallest among all of the other permanent magnets)

Applications of Alnico Magnets:

  • Relays
  • Controls
  • Generators
  • Receivers
  • Telephones
  • Bell ringers
  • Loudspeakers
  • Cow magnets
  • Microphones

Ceramic Magnets

Sintered Ferrite Magnets

Sintered Ferrite (Hard ferrite magnets) were developed in the 1960’s as a low cost alternative to metallic magnets. Even though they exhibit low energy (compared with other permanent magnet materials) and are relatively brittle and hard, Ceramic Magnets (Hard ferrite magnets) have won wide acceptance due to their good resistance to demagnetization, excellent corrosion resistance and low price per pound. In fact, measured by weight, ferrite represents more than 75 percent of the world magnet consumption. It is the first choice for most types of DC motors, magnetic separators, magnetic resonance imaging and automotive sensors.

Besides industrial application, Ceramic Magnets (Hard ferrite magnets) are widely use in Educational area.

SmCo Magnets

Samarium Cobalt MAGNETS

Permanent Samarium Cobalt magnets (SmCo) are composed of samarium, cobalt and iron.
These rare earth magnets are extremely strong for their small size, metallic
in appearance and found in simple shapes such as rings, blocks and discs.

Attributes of Samarium Cobalt

  • High resistance to demagnetization
  • High energy (magnetic strength is strong for its size)
  • Good temperature stability
  • Expensive material (cobalt is market price sensitive)

Applications of Samarium Cobalt

Computer disc drives, sensors, traveling wave tubes, linear actuators,
satellite systems, motors where temporary stability is vital.

Magnetizing and Handling

Samarium Cobalt magnets are very brittle and very strong magnetically. Therefore,
it is crucial to handle these magnets with extreme care to avoid personal
injury and damage to the magnets. Fingers can be severely pinched between
attracting magnets. Magnets can chip if allowed to “jump at” an
attracting object. It is highly recommended that when constructing rare
earth magnetic assemblies, they be magnetized after assembly.

Samarium Cobalt Machining

Since Samarium Cobalt magnet material is prone to chipping and cracking,
it does not lend itself to conventional machining methods. It can, however,
be abrasively ground, but only with the use of liberal amounts of coolant.
The coolant minimizes heat fracturing and the risk of fires caused by
oxidized grinding dust.

Hook Pot Magnets

Pot Magnets (Mounting Magnets) are often used as tools for various activities in workshops and in industry. They can be used for holding workpieces whilst welding, cutting, milling or drilling etc. Because of the lack of moving parts and the robust construction of pot magnets, the life is unlimited and no maintenance is required. Just keeping the pole surface clean guarantee reliable operation and a long life.

How to choose a pot magnet?
The basic principle of the holding or pot magnet is to direct and concentrate the flux from both magnetic poles to one active face. This is usually achieved with steel pole pieces or a steel-backing cup.

The standard selection can be broken down into three material types and there is a great variety of systems available. The following data should act as a simple guide:

1) Rare Earth Samarium & Neodymium, pots and assemblies can offer up to eleven times the performance of a Ferrite system in a comparable size. Applications tend to be specialized engineering projects where performance and available space are key factors. Maximum operating temperatures are +60°C for the Neodymium and +150°C – +250°C for the Samarium depending on the design configuration.

2) Sintered Ferrite, this material offers a good performance from an inexpensive magnet, however, they tend to be bulky and are not always suitable where space is an important factor. The steel parts are plated & the Ferrite is inert thus corrosion is limited. Maximum operating temperature is +120 °C.

3) Cast AlNiCo, offers a better holding force than Ferrite systems and is the only pot magnet that can be heated to extreme temperatures. However, the high cost of the Cobalt content in the cast magnet makes the price prohibitive unless the application requires temperatures over +120°C up to a maximum of +500°C.

When considering your selection, please be aware of the following factors: The stated Kg Pull (holding/gripping force) is based on the magnets retaining force against a direct pull when offered to a clean ground mild steel surface with a minimum thickness of 8mm. Painted or un-ground surfaces will reduce this force, assemblies working in shear will support approximately 1/3 of the stated value.

Eye Screw Pot Magnets

Pot Magnets (Mounting Magnets) are often used as tools for various activities in workshops and in industry. They can be used for holding workpieces whilst welding, cutting, milling or drilling etc. Because of the lack of moving parts and the robust construction of pot magnets, the life is unlimited and no maintenance is required. Just keeping the pole surface clean guarantee reliable operation and a long life.

How to choose a pot magnet?
The basic principle of the holding or pot magnet is to direct and concentrate the flux from both magnetic poles to one active face. This is usually achieved with steel pole pieces or a steel-backing cup.

The standard selection can be broken down into three material types and there is a great variety of systems available. The following data should act as a simple guide:

1) Rare Earth Samarium & Neodymium, pots and assemblies can offer up to eleven times the performance of a Ferrite system in a comparable size. Applications tend to be specialized engineering projects where performance and available space are key factors. Maximum operating temperatures are +60°C for the Neodymium and +150°C – +250°C for the Samarium depending on the design configuration.

2) Sintered Ferrite, this material offers a good performance from an inexpensive magnet, however, they tend to be bulky and are not always suitable where space is an important factor. The steel parts are plated & the Ferrite is inert thus corrosion is limited. Maximum operating temperature is +120 °C.

3) Cast AlNiCo, offers a better holding force than Ferrite systems and is the only pot magnet that can be heated to extreme temperatures. However, the high cost of the Cobalt content in the cast magnet makes the price prohibitive unless the application requires temperatures over +120°C up to a maximum of +500°C.

When considering your selection, please be aware of the following factors: The stated Kg Pull (holding/gripping force) is based on the magnets retaining force against a direct pull when offered to a clean ground mild steel surface with a minimum thickness of 8mm. Painted or un-ground surfaces will reduce this force, assemblies working in shear will support approximately 1/3 of the stated value.

Screw Pot Magnets

Pot Magnets (Mounting Magnets) are often used as tools for various activities in workshops and in industry. They can be used for holding workpieces whilst welding, cutting, milling or drilling etc. Because of the lack of moving parts and the robust construction of pot magnets, the life is unlimited and no maintenance is required. Just keeping the pole surface clean guarantee reliable operation and a long life.

How to choose a pot magnet?
The basic principle of the holding or pot magnet is to direct and concentrate the flux from both magnetic poles to one active face. This is usually achieved with steel pole pieces or a steel-backing cup.

The standard selection can be broken down into three material types and there is a great variety of systems available. The following data should act as a simple guide:

1) Rare Earth Samarium & Neodymium, pots and assemblies can offer up to eleven times the performance of a Ferrite system in a comparable size. Applications tend to be specialized engineering projects where performance and available space are key factors. Maximum operating temperatures are +60°C for the Neodymium and +150°C – +250°C for the Samarium depending on the design configuration.

2) Sintered Ferrite, this material offers a good performance from an inexpensive magnet, however, they tend to be bulky and are not always suitable where space is an important factor. The steel parts are plated & the Ferrite is inert thus corrosion is limited. Maximum operating temperature is +120 °C.

3) Cast AlNiCo, offers a better holding force than Ferrite systems and is the only pot magnet that can be heated to extreme temperatures. However, the high cost of the Cobalt content in the cast magnet makes the price prohibitive unless the application requires temperatures over +120°C up to a maximum of +500°C.

When considering your selection, please be aware of the following factors: The stated Kg Pull (holding/gripping force) is based on the magnets retaining force against a direct pull when offered to a clean ground mild steel surface with a minimum thickness of 8mm. Painted or un-ground surfaces will reduce this force, assemblies working in shear will support approximately 1/3 of the stated value.

Ring Pot Magnets

Pot Magnets (Mounting Magnets) are often used as tools for various activities in workshops and in industry. They can be used for holding workpieces whilst welding, cutting, milling or drilling etc. Because of the lack of moving parts and the robust construction of pot magnets, the life is unlimited and no maintenance is required. Just keeping the pole surface clean guarantee reliable operation and a long life.

How to choose a pot magnet?
The basic principle of the holding or pot magnet is to direct and concentrate the flux from both magnetic poles to one active face. This is usually achieved with steel pole pieces or a steel-backing cup.

The standard selection can be broken down into three material types and there is a great variety of systems available. The following data should act as a simple guide:

1) Rare Earth Samarium & Neodymium, pots and assemblies can offer up to eleven times the performance of a Ferrite system in a comparable size. Applications tend to be specialized engineering projects where performance and available space are key factors. Maximum operating temperatures are +60°C for the Neodymium and +150°C – +250°C for the Samarium depending on the design configuration.

2) Sintered Ferrite, this material offers a good performance from an inexpensive magnet, however, they tend to be bulky and are not always suitable where space is an important factor. The steel parts are plated & the Ferrite is inert thus corrosion is limited. Maximum operating temperature is +120 °C.

3) Cast AlNiCo, offers a better holding force than Ferrite systems and is the only pot magnet that can be heated to extreme temperatures. However, the high cost of the Cobalt content in the cast magnet makes the price prohibitive unless the application requires temperatures over +120°C up to a maximum of +500°C.

When considering your selection, please be aware of the following factors: The stated Kg Pull (holding/gripping force) is based on the magnets retaining force against a direct pull when offered to a clean ground mild steel surface with a minimum thickness of 8mm. Painted or un-ground surfaces will reduce this force, assemblies working in shear will support approximately 1/3 of the stated value.

Countersunk Pot Magnets

Pot Magnets (Mounting Magnets) are often used as tools for various activities in workshops and in industry. They can be used for holding workpieces whilst welding, cutting, milling or drilling etc. Because of the lack of moving parts and the robust construction of pot magnets, the life is unlimited and no maintenance is required. Just keeping the pole surface clean guarantee reliable operation and a long life.

How to choose a pot magnet?
The basic principle of the holding or pot magnet is to direct and concentrate the flux from both magnetic poles to one active face. This is usually achieved with steel pole pieces or a steel-backing cup.

The standard selection can be broken down into three material types and there is a great variety of systems available. The following data should act as a simple guide:

1) Rare Earth Samarium & Neodymium, pots and assemblies can offer up to eleven times the performance of a Ferrite system in a comparable size. Applications tend to be specialized engineering projects where performance and available space are key factors. Maximum operating temperatures are +60°C for the Neodymium and +150°C – +250°C for the Samarium depending on the design configuration.

2) Sintered Ferrite, this material offers a good performance from an inexpensive magnet, however, they tend to be bulky and are not always suitable where space is an important factor. The steel parts are plated & the Ferrite is inert thus corrosion is limited. Maximum operating temperature is +120 °C.

3) Cast AlNiCo, offers a better holding force than Ferrite systems and is the only pot magnet that can be heated to extreme temperatures. However, the high cost of the Cobalt content in the cast magnet makes the price prohibitive unless the application requires temperatures over +120°C up to a maximum of +500°C.

When considering your selection, please be aware of the following factors: The stated Kg Pull (holding/gripping force) is based on the magnets retaining force against a direct pull when offered to a clean ground mild steel surface with a minimum thickness of 8mm. Painted or un-ground surfaces will reduce this force, assemblies working in shear will support approximately 1/3 of the stated value.