Magnetic Field Viewer Film

Magnetic Field Viewer Film

Magnetic Field viewer is a micro-encapsulated film which enables the user to view a static magnetic field such as commonly emitted by permanent magnets or dc electromagnets. Simply placing the film directly on the surface of the magnetic material in question can instantly reveal a magnetic field of any shape or pattern.
Get Magnetic Field viewer Film in stock from SupraMagnets.com online.
The highly flexible film easily conforms to magnetic surfaces with any degree of convexity or concavity. Magnetic Field viewer is used across the globe for quality control, product demonstration, reverse engineering, authentication and educational purposes.
Encased within the green film are millions of magnetic particles suspended in oil. A magnet will attract the particles to the areas where the magnet is the strongest – at its poles. The poles appear dark green. Multiple pole magnets such as those on business card magnets will display interesting patterns, such as the example pictured below.

The film is highly flexible and can wrapped arround objects.
The viewer film come from the factory as a uniform green. However, once the film is exposed to a magnetic field, black lines or dark areas will remain in the film, even after the magnetic field is removed. This is normal behavior for the film. The film can be re-used over and over again and will continue to show the magnetic field of sources strong enough to coerce the the suspended iron particles in the film.

There is no practical way to reset the film to the uniform green from the time of manufacture. Exposing the film to a very large magnet or magnetic field can bring the film fairly close to an even color. Customers have reported that magnetic tape de-gaussers, used to erase audio tape, work fairly well at restoring the original green color to the film.

Hook Pot Magnets

Pot Magnets (Mounting Magnets) are often used as tools for various activities in workshops and in industry. They can be used for holding workpieces whilst welding, cutting, milling or drilling etc. Because of the lack of moving parts and the robust construction of pot magnets, the life is unlimited and no maintenance is required. Just keeping the pole surface clean guarantee reliable operation and a long life.

How to choose a pot magnet?
The basic principle of the holding or pot magnet is to direct and concentrate the flux from both magnetic poles to one active face. This is usually achieved with steel pole pieces or a steel-backing cup.

The standard selection can be broken down into three material types and there is a great variety of systems available. The following data should act as a simple guide:

1) Rare Earth Samarium & Neodymium, pots and assemblies can offer up to eleven times the performance of a Ferrite system in a comparable size. Applications tend to be specialized engineering projects where performance and available space are key factors. Maximum operating temperatures are +60°C for the Neodymium and +150°C – +250°C for the Samarium depending on the design configuration.

2) Sintered Ferrite, this material offers a good performance from an inexpensive magnet, however, they tend to be bulky and are not always suitable where space is an important factor. The steel parts are plated & the Ferrite is inert thus corrosion is limited. Maximum operating temperature is +120 °C.

3) Cast AlNiCo, offers a better holding force than Ferrite systems and is the only pot magnet that can be heated to extreme temperatures. However, the high cost of the Cobalt content in the cast magnet makes the price prohibitive unless the application requires temperatures over +120°C up to a maximum of +500°C.

When considering your selection, please be aware of the following factors: The stated Kg Pull (holding/gripping force) is based on the magnets retaining force against a direct pull when offered to a clean ground mild steel surface with a minimum thickness of 8mm. Painted or un-ground surfaces will reduce this force, assemblies working in shear will support approximately 1/3 of the stated value.

Eye Screw Pot Magnets

Pot Magnets (Mounting Magnets) are often used as tools for various activities in workshops and in industry. They can be used for holding workpieces whilst welding, cutting, milling or drilling etc. Because of the lack of moving parts and the robust construction of pot magnets, the life is unlimited and no maintenance is required. Just keeping the pole surface clean guarantee reliable operation and a long life.

How to choose a pot magnet?
The basic principle of the holding or pot magnet is to direct and concentrate the flux from both magnetic poles to one active face. This is usually achieved with steel pole pieces or a steel-backing cup.

The standard selection can be broken down into three material types and there is a great variety of systems available. The following data should act as a simple guide:

1) Rare Earth Samarium & Neodymium, pots and assemblies can offer up to eleven times the performance of a Ferrite system in a comparable size. Applications tend to be specialized engineering projects where performance and available space are key factors. Maximum operating temperatures are +60°C for the Neodymium and +150°C – +250°C for the Samarium depending on the design configuration.

2) Sintered Ferrite, this material offers a good performance from an inexpensive magnet, however, they tend to be bulky and are not always suitable where space is an important factor. The steel parts are plated & the Ferrite is inert thus corrosion is limited. Maximum operating temperature is +120 °C.

3) Cast AlNiCo, offers a better holding force than Ferrite systems and is the only pot magnet that can be heated to extreme temperatures. However, the high cost of the Cobalt content in the cast magnet makes the price prohibitive unless the application requires temperatures over +120°C up to a maximum of +500°C.

When considering your selection, please be aware of the following factors: The stated Kg Pull (holding/gripping force) is based on the magnets retaining force against a direct pull when offered to a clean ground mild steel surface with a minimum thickness of 8mm. Painted or un-ground surfaces will reduce this force, assemblies working in shear will support approximately 1/3 of the stated value.

Screw Pot Magnets

Pot Magnets (Mounting Magnets) are often used as tools for various activities in workshops and in industry. They can be used for holding workpieces whilst welding, cutting, milling or drilling etc. Because of the lack of moving parts and the robust construction of pot magnets, the life is unlimited and no maintenance is required. Just keeping the pole surface clean guarantee reliable operation and a long life.

How to choose a pot magnet?
The basic principle of the holding or pot magnet is to direct and concentrate the flux from both magnetic poles to one active face. This is usually achieved with steel pole pieces or a steel-backing cup.

The standard selection can be broken down into three material types and there is a great variety of systems available. The following data should act as a simple guide:

1) Rare Earth Samarium & Neodymium, pots and assemblies can offer up to eleven times the performance of a Ferrite system in a comparable size. Applications tend to be specialized engineering projects where performance and available space are key factors. Maximum operating temperatures are +60°C for the Neodymium and +150°C – +250°C for the Samarium depending on the design configuration.

2) Sintered Ferrite, this material offers a good performance from an inexpensive magnet, however, they tend to be bulky and are not always suitable where space is an important factor. The steel parts are plated & the Ferrite is inert thus corrosion is limited. Maximum operating temperature is +120 °C.

3) Cast AlNiCo, offers a better holding force than Ferrite systems and is the only pot magnet that can be heated to extreme temperatures. However, the high cost of the Cobalt content in the cast magnet makes the price prohibitive unless the application requires temperatures over +120°C up to a maximum of +500°C.

When considering your selection, please be aware of the following factors: The stated Kg Pull (holding/gripping force) is based on the magnets retaining force against a direct pull when offered to a clean ground mild steel surface with a minimum thickness of 8mm. Painted or un-ground surfaces will reduce this force, assemblies working in shear will support approximately 1/3 of the stated value.

Ring Pot Magnets

Pot Magnets (Mounting Magnets) are often used as tools for various activities in workshops and in industry. They can be used for holding workpieces whilst welding, cutting, milling or drilling etc. Because of the lack of moving parts and the robust construction of pot magnets, the life is unlimited and no maintenance is required. Just keeping the pole surface clean guarantee reliable operation and a long life.

How to choose a pot magnet?
The basic principle of the holding or pot magnet is to direct and concentrate the flux from both magnetic poles to one active face. This is usually achieved with steel pole pieces or a steel-backing cup.

The standard selection can be broken down into three material types and there is a great variety of systems available. The following data should act as a simple guide:

1) Rare Earth Samarium & Neodymium, pots and assemblies can offer up to eleven times the performance of a Ferrite system in a comparable size. Applications tend to be specialized engineering projects where performance and available space are key factors. Maximum operating temperatures are +60°C for the Neodymium and +150°C – +250°C for the Samarium depending on the design configuration.

2) Sintered Ferrite, this material offers a good performance from an inexpensive magnet, however, they tend to be bulky and are not always suitable where space is an important factor. The steel parts are plated & the Ferrite is inert thus corrosion is limited. Maximum operating temperature is +120 °C.

3) Cast AlNiCo, offers a better holding force than Ferrite systems and is the only pot magnet that can be heated to extreme temperatures. However, the high cost of the Cobalt content in the cast magnet makes the price prohibitive unless the application requires temperatures over +120°C up to a maximum of +500°C.

When considering your selection, please be aware of the following factors: The stated Kg Pull (holding/gripping force) is based on the magnets retaining force against a direct pull when offered to a clean ground mild steel surface with a minimum thickness of 8mm. Painted or un-ground surfaces will reduce this force, assemblies working in shear will support approximately 1/3 of the stated value.

Countersunk Pot Magnets

Pot Magnets (Mounting Magnets) are often used as tools for various activities in workshops and in industry. They can be used for holding workpieces whilst welding, cutting, milling or drilling etc. Because of the lack of moving parts and the robust construction of pot magnets, the life is unlimited and no maintenance is required. Just keeping the pole surface clean guarantee reliable operation and a long life.

How to choose a pot magnet?
The basic principle of the holding or pot magnet is to direct and concentrate the flux from both magnetic poles to one active face. This is usually achieved with steel pole pieces or a steel-backing cup.

The standard selection can be broken down into three material types and there is a great variety of systems available. The following data should act as a simple guide:

1) Rare Earth Samarium & Neodymium, pots and assemblies can offer up to eleven times the performance of a Ferrite system in a comparable size. Applications tend to be specialized engineering projects where performance and available space are key factors. Maximum operating temperatures are +60°C for the Neodymium and +150°C – +250°C for the Samarium depending on the design configuration.

2) Sintered Ferrite, this material offers a good performance from an inexpensive magnet, however, they tend to be bulky and are not always suitable where space is an important factor. The steel parts are plated & the Ferrite is inert thus corrosion is limited. Maximum operating temperature is +120 °C.

3) Cast AlNiCo, offers a better holding force than Ferrite systems and is the only pot magnet that can be heated to extreme temperatures. However, the high cost of the Cobalt content in the cast magnet makes the price prohibitive unless the application requires temperatures over +120°C up to a maximum of +500°C.

When considering your selection, please be aware of the following factors: The stated Kg Pull (holding/gripping force) is based on the magnets retaining force against a direct pull when offered to a clean ground mild steel surface with a minimum thickness of 8mm. Painted or un-ground surfaces will reduce this force, assemblies working in shear will support approximately 1/3 of the stated value.